Tag Archive | Renewable energy

“Sea change needed for low-carbon economy”

http://www.upi.com/Sea-change-needed-for-low-carbon-economy/6421490006404/?nll=1

A report published by the IEA and the International Renewable Energy Agency found the share of fossil fuels used to satisfy energy demand would need to be cut in half by 2050 and emissions would need to fall more than 70 percent to keep the mean temperature from rising.

“Combined Wind and Solar Reach 7.2% of Total US Electricity in 1H 2016”

Share of US Electricity Generation in 1H 2016 by Source

http://gregor.us/coal/combined-wind-and-solar-reach-7-2-of-total-us-electricity-in-1h-2016/

The transition to renewables, wind and solar power in particular, has typically run ahead of expectations this decade and fresh data from the United States illustrates this phenomenon nicely. In the first half of this year, combined wind and solar provided 140.97 TWh of the 1959.20 TWh generated in the country.

“Biggest Battery Contracts Move U.K. Closer to Grid-Scale Storage”

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-25/biggest-battery-contracts-move-u-k-closer-to-grid-scale-storage

Grid-scale electricity storage will move closer to commercial reality on Friday when the U.K.’s grid operator offers contracts to companies to help balance the network, a key measure needed to help balance increasing supply from renewables.

lightbulblogo

A game changing moment for the UK.

“By 2030, Renewables Will Be The World’s Primary Power Source”

link

In November, the International Energy Agency quietly dropped this bombshell projection: “Driven by continued policy support, renewables account for half of additional global generation, overtaking coal around 2030 to become the largest power source.”

“Renewable Energy Now Accounts For 80% Of New Generation (What’s The Catch?)”

whatsthecatch

Link

According to the latest report from the International Energy Agency, renewable energy now accounts for 80 percent of new generation among the 34 developed countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. But, don’t break out the bubbly just yet. The new IEA report raises a number of concerns about the prospects for continued rapid growth in renewable energy investment through 2020, and the picture gets particularly murky when you throw non-OECD members into the mix.

evilemoticon

Uncertainty about the political commitment to renewables in both developed and developing countries is making the future unclear. Policy makers want economic growth; and hydrocarbons are still cheap enough to be attractive energy sources. In addition the hydrocarbon energy lobbies are getting more interest.

“UK’s new energy and environment ministers opposed green energy”

mattewhancock

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jul/15/uk-environment-ministers-opposed-green-energy?CMP=EMCENVEML1631

The new set of Conservative environment and energy ministers announced on Tuesday bring a track record of opposing renewable energy, having fought against wind and solar farms, enthusiastically backed fracking and argued that green subsidies damage the economy.

“Norway’s oil fund may inject $40bn in renewables”

buy-buy-sell-sell

 

http://reneweconomy.com.au/2014/norway-decides-oil-fund-spend-renewables-65043

Norway Prime Minister Erna Solberg has confirmed plans to increase the exposure of its $920 billion sovereign wealth fund – the world’s largest – to renewable energy, part of its stated plans to use its vast wealth to combat climate change.

The government has already appointed independent experts to evaluate whether the fund should exit its coal, oil, and gas investments, which currently make up around 10 per cent of its value.

The Government Pension Fund Global – established only in 1996 – owns 1.2% of the world’s listed stocks.

lightbulblogo

 

$40 billion is equivalent to about 5% of the Norway fund’s total assets. Combining this with 10% in Coal, Oil and Gas makes about 15% of the funds total value. A fund that owns 1.2% of all global stocks and has 10% of its fund in hydrocarbons can’t give too much information away; because this would literally move markets before it could do anything and harm the performance of the fund.

Every Renewable Cloud Has a Silver Lining

cloudsonhorizon

http://www.energypost.eu/end-near-national-renewable-energy-subsidy-schemes-eu/

The end is near – for national renewable energy subsidy schemes in the EU

The national renewable support schemes in the EU are on the verge of a major overhaul. National governments will soon not be allowed anymore to limit renewables subsidies to domestic producers: they will have to treat all EU-based producers alike. This at any rate is the very likely outcome of a court case now before the EU Court of Justice, says Peter Niermeijer, Secretary-General of RECS International, an organisation that promotes pan-European trade in renewable energy, in an interview with Energy Post. According to Niermeijer, the court decision, expected in a matter of months, will have far-reaching political consequences: it will force an end to the fragmentation of national energy policies in the EU and give a big push to the integration of the EU energy market. It will also radically undermine existing support schemes, including the laws which form the basis of the German Energiewende.

lightbulblogo

Every cloud has a silver lining. The loss of national renewable energy subsidies means the introduction of a common renewable energy policy at the EU level.

“Envisioning a Nation Run On Clean Energy”

usavchinacleanenergy

https://woods.stanford.edu/news-events/news/envisioning-nation-run-clean-energy

Stanford Woods Institute fellow presents new roadmap to renewable energy for all 50 U.S. states
Stanford Woods Institute Senior Fellow Mark Jacobson and his colleagues recently developed detailed plans to transform the energy infrastructure of New York, California and Washington states from fossil fuels to 100 percent renewable resources by 2050.

The roadmap includes an online interactive map tailored to maximize the resource potential of each state. Hovering a cursor over California, for example, reveals that the Golden State can meet virtually all of its power demands (transportation, electricity, heating, etc.) in 2050 by switching to a clean technology portfolio that is 55 percent solar, 35 percent wind (on- and offshore), 5 percent geothermal and 4 percent hydroelectric.

lightbulblogo

Having missed the signing of the Kyoto Protocol, then watching Europe target 40% emission cuts by 2030 and China move to number two in renewable energy in 2013, America is quietly making plans to go 100% renewable. If New York, California and Washington can achieve this by 2050 it would be amazing. Given the size of the economies of these three states, it would represent a major global impact.