Tag Archive | extinction

“World’s largest king penguin colony has declined by 90%”

A huge colony of king penguins on the Île aux Cochons in 1982

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/30/worlds-largest-king-penguin-colony-has-declined-by-90

Number of king penguins on the remote Île aux Cochons has fallen from 2m to 200,000, warn scientists

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“Orangutans Have Been Adapting To Humans For 70,000 Years”

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Rather than being an ecologically-fragile ape, there is evidence that orangutans have long been adapting to humans. The modern orangutan is the product of both environmental and human impacts, and where they live and how they act appear to reflect our shared history.

“The axolotl—nature’s miracle healer—is on the brink of extinction”

epa01204239 The Axolotl ('Ambystoma mexicanum') is the best-known of the Mexican neotenic mole salamanders belonging to the Tiger Salamander complex, at the Friedrich-Schiller-Univerity of Jena, Germany, 18 December 2007. Larvae of this species fail to undergo metamorphosis, so the adults remain aquatic and gilled, which is the reason the scientists breed them. So they can examin the development of cells from the early embryo phase. The Axolotl also have the ability to let lost extremities grow again.

https://qz.com/1304554/the-axolotl-natures-miracle-healer-is-on-the-brink-of-extinction/

The axolotl, or Ambystoma mexicanum, is the ultimate survivalist: When an axolotl loses a leg, tail, or a bit of its heart, the body part regrows and nary a scar remains. But the hardy creature is on the brink of extinction.

“One in eight birds is threatened with extinction, global study finds”

Puffins (Fratercula arctica), South Pembrokeshire, Wales

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One in eight bird species is threatened with global extinction, and once widespread creatures such as the puffin, snowy owl and turtle dove are plummeting towards oblivion, according to the definitive study of global bird populations.

“The WWF warns the Amazon could lose half its wildlife by the end of the century”

A photograph made available on 04 October 2013 shows the river Tiputini as it passes by the northern border of Yasuni National Park in Ecuador, 16 May 2007. The Ecuadoran Congress approved on 03 October 2013 new drilling for oil development and accompanying roads in the remote northeast section of Yasuni National Park, a 900,000 hectare Amazon forest which is considered one of the most biodiverse areas in the world.  EPA/CECILIA PUEBLA

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The Amazon, the single largest tropical rainforest and home to 10% of the world’s known species, could lose half of its plants and animals by the end of the century as global warming ravages the planet—and that loss of biodiversity is just a snapshot of what’s happening to the world’s forests, wetlands, and seas.

“Desperate scientists created a Match.com profile for a frog who may be the last of his species”

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Desperate scientists created a Match.com profile for a frog who may be the last of his species

There’s a chance a frog who lives in a tank in a Bolivian museum is the last of his species. But he reportedly hasn’t given up hope, if one can ascribe hope to a frog. The male Sehuencas water frog continues to make mating calls from within his confinement at Bolivia’s Cochabamba Natural History Museum.

“Polar bears could become extinct faster than was feared, study says”

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Polar bears could be sliding towards extinction faster than previously feared, with the animals facing an increasing struggle to find enough food to survive as climate change steadily transforms their environment.

“‘A different dimension of loss’: inside the great insect die-off”

An Oxysternon conspicillatum dung beetle from South America

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Scientists have identified 2 million species of living things. No one knows how many more are out there, and tens of thousands may be vanishing before we have even had a chance to encounter them.

“Is the Modern Mass Extinction Overrated?”

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http://nautil.us/issue/53/monsters/is-the-modern-mass-extinction-overrated?mc_cid=7ff25db972&mc_eid=eaaa9fef29

After decades of researching the impact that humans are having on animal and plant species around the world, Chris Thomas has a simple message: Cheer up. Yes, we’ve wiped out woolly mammoths and ground sloths, and are finishing off black rhinos and Siberian tigers, but the doom is not all gloom. Myriad species, thanks in large part to humans who inadvertently transport them around the world, have blossomed in new regions, mated with like species and formed new hybrids that have themselves gone forth and prospered. We’re talking mammals, birds, trees, insects, microbes—all your flora and fauna. “Virtually all countries and islands in the world have experienced substantial increases in the numbers of species that can be found in and on them,” writes Thomas in his new book, Inheritors of the Earth: How Nature Is Thriving in an Age of Extinction.