“Earth’s sixth mass extinction event under way, scientists warn”

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Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.

“Vulnerable ‘chokepoints’ threaten global food supply, warns report”

A map of global marine traffic on 26 June 2017 at 15.30 GMT.

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Increasingly vulnerable “chokepoints” are threatening the security of the global food supply, according to a new report. It identifies 14 critical locations, including the Suez canal, Black Sea ports and Brazil’s road network, almost all of which are already hit by frequent disruptions.

“Lynx could return to Britain this year after absence of 1,300 years”

A Eurasian lynx stalking prey in brushwood

Lynx!

After an absence of 1,300 years, the lynx could be back in UK forests by the end of 2017. The Lynx UK Trust has announced it will apply for a trial reintroduction for six lynx into the Kielder forest, Northumberland, following a two-year consultation process with local stakeholders.

“France’s climate plan includes ending fossil fuel vehicle sales by 2040”

France’s climate plan includes ending fossil fuel vehicle sales by 2040

Just one day after we found out that Volvo intends to stop selling cars with exclusively internal combustion engine drivetrains by 2019, France’s minister of the environment Nicolas Hulot has detailed a plan to the Financial Times for the country that includes ending the sale of fossil fuel-powered cars by 2040. The effective ban will be achieved through a mix of financial incentives for alternative fuel vehicles, and increased taxes on older, internal combustion cars.

“Global Warming Might Be Speeding Up”

Image result for climate change dashboard

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-07-06/global-warming-might-be-speeding-up

Two climate scientists suggest they’ve come closer to resolving a critical debate about how quickly human activity will heat up the planet. The answer isn’t good news.

Some parts of the planet heat up more slowly than others, they explain. But as more time passes, regions once less affected by global warming will get hotter. Thus the bulk of planetary warming this century may actually be back-loaded onto its final decades.

“Bio-Buildings are carbon ‘banks'”

Actual volume of banked carbon in TAM

http://www.realworldvisuals.com/rwv-projects/bio-buildings?ct=t(Real_World_Visuals_Bio_Building)

 

The use of bio-based materials has been met with scepticism from architects, insurers and contractors.  That is now changing as bio materials become mainstream in the construction industry. Seeing the ‘carbon-capture’ potential of these sorts of buildings could help those in the sector consider the full potential of working with these materials. The bubbles here represent a carbon saving.

“Geely’s Volvo to go all electric with new models from 2019”

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-volvocars-geely-electric-idUSKBN19Q0BJ?mc_cid=f1f70e9c4d&mc_eid=eaaa9fef29

All Volvo car models launched after 2019 will be electric or hybrids, the Chinese-owned company said on Wednesday, making it the first major traditional automaker to set a date for phasing out vehicles powered solely by the internal combustion engine.

 

“The Winners And Losers Of Antarctica’s Great Thaw”

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As the ice-free areas expand, the distances between them will decrease, giving plants and animals more opportunity to spread through the landscape. On the Antarctic Peninsula, which has already warmed more than anywhere else in Antarctica, many of the ice-free patches will expand so much that they will start joining together.

Will this increase in habitat availability benefit the plants and animals that live there? It will definitely provide new opportunities for some native plants and animals to expand their range and colonise new areas. The warming climate may also give a boost to species that are currently hampered by the lack of warmth, nutrients and water.

However, the potential benefits seem likely to be outweighed by the negatives. The joining-up of habitat patches could allow species that have been isolated for much of their evolutionary past to meet suddenly. If the newcomers to a particular area outcompete the native species, then it may lead to localised extinctions. Over the coming centuries this could lead to the loss of many plants and animals, and the homogenisation of Antarctica’s ecosystems.